Effects of Reverse Mortgages on Condos and HOAs

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comMany condominiums and HOAs are filled with units and homes that are financed with bank-held mortgages. Reverse Mortgages are available to home and condo unit owners over the age of 62 who would prefer to draw money from the equity in their home or condo unit. These mortgage owners can either take a lump sum or periodic payments from the equity in their home. The mortgage holder gets paid back when the home is sold or liquidated upon the death of the mortgage owner.

The Federal Housing Administration, better known as FHA, is the leading insurer of these mortgages. Banks prefer to offer mortgages to borrowers and real estate that is FHA approved as it means FHA is willing to guarantee some of the risk associated with making the loan. For this reason, FHA approval of the property being mortgaged is very important.

Condominium associations and HOAs are not required to apply for FHA certification. In fact, many voluntarily choose not to undergo FHA certification. There are many reasons for this but FHA certification requires a 10% minimum contribution to the association Reserve Fund and also has percentage of rental unit caps and other restrictions. Associations that forego FHA certification are effectively limiting their unit owners from receiving an FHA-backed Reverse Mortgage. Many unit owners are surprised when they learn that their condominium or HOA unit is not eligible for such a mortgage, especially when their units are paid off and they wish to access their equity. This can lead to outcry from unit owners that the association seek FHA certification.

One concern many HOAs and condominium associations have about Reverse Mortgages is how they can affect the association’s ability to collect delinquent common fees. Once the Reverse Mortgage is issued, it behaves like any other mortgage. The association’s lien on the unit can be superseded by the mortgage holder’s lien in the event of a foreclosure. This can lead to a prolonged foreclosure process in the event of a default. For this reason alone, some associations prefer to keep their association’s free of FHA certification, thus preventing the mortgage holder’s lien from ever getting in the way of the association’s right to foreclose on a delinquent unit owner.

The bottom line is that the decision to seek FHA approval lies strictly with the Board of Directors. Unit owners seeking Reverse Mortgages will not be successful without an FHA approval for the community association. Depending on the number of unit owners aged 62 and greater, the demand for Reverse Mortgages could increase at any HOA. Boards should be aware of the needs of the unit owners and take appropriate steps to meet those needs or be prepared to explain why they chose to ignore them. Reverse Mortgages have grown greatly in popularity over the past few years. If your community association isn’t already approved for such loans, there will likely be a need in the not too distant future.

The decision to seek or not seek FHA certification does not impact an association’s ability to borrow money on behalf of the association should the need arise. HOALendingXchange.com is the ultimate resource for community associations and HOAs seeking money. Get started with your own HOA loan by simply filling out the HOALendingXchange inquiry form and HOA loan experts will get busy preparing their very best HOA loan concepts for your consideration.

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The Best Loan for your Community Association

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comAs a banker specialized in the community association industry, I have paid close attention to the shifts of the banking industry since the beginning of the 2007 recession. The 2007 recession! Hmmmm… Has it ended yet?

One very significant point that the “man-on-the street” does not appreciate is the hyper level of new regulatory control that has been heaped upon banks since the beginning of the recession. As much of the “man-on-the-street” perspectives coalesce to; “a lot of Wall Street Bankers should have gone to jail”. The reality is that they did not. The government responded with enhanced bank regulations, which had the unintended consequence to restrict ease of access of capital to every-day people and businesses. Where does that leave you as a community association leader?

The bank regulators are formula driven versus being common sense driven.   They, as individuals, also are nearly impossible to discharge from their positions so they are not worried about making business mistakes. For efficiency reasons the regulators perceive to be accurate, the regulators are focusing on the bigger banks.   The bigger the bank, the more intense the regulatory oversight. A common perspective within the financial services industry is that the large banks have been privatized by the Federal government. Business decisions are being guided.

Enough of my whining and on to the answer for your community association. The point is that the platform for how banks operate has changed from how you have understood how they operate. Large banks have been interrupted due to regulatory inflexibility to operate in what one would consider as a “consumer service methodology”. I define a large bank as any bank over $5.0 Billion. A bank under that amount has been impacted by the regulatory environment but they still retain the “desire” to service the consumer. It has been my experience that banks over that level have largely capitulated to governmental demands.

So what is the best loan for your Community Association? It is likely a loan that is negotiated with a bank that is less than $5.0 Billion in Assets. It is a bank that is a member of Community Associations Institute (CAI) because they have decided to specialize in providing financing to this industry. The last and most important qualifier is skills. The first question that you need to ask the banker is: “How many years have you been a Community Association Specialized Lender?”   If their answer is 7 years or less, keep shopping…

Why is the year 2008 an important pivot point? The regulatory impact is the key. A banker entering any business activity guided by the hyperactive pressure of the government’s regulatory pressure since the recession does not actually understand the community association industry. They understand government control.

If you find a banker that has been active in the market more than 7 years, you have a community association lending hero. A person that has many years of skills honed by the growth years, survived the recession and been managing against the regulatory environment.

A lot of this conversation does not seem to address the article’s title. The point is that there is much more to a community association loan than the interest rate. It is my experience that Community Associations are notorious for gravitating to everything that is cheap for the exclusive reason that it is cheap. The reality is that “value” is what is important, not “cheapness”. Getting good service and good quality products at a fair price is Value. If you deal with banks with bankers that have not been in the industry prior to 2008, chances are that you not getting a proper value. The banker may not understand your business (Association). The bank will not likely be the lower cost. The bank will most importantly be the providing the best Terms & Conditions because they have “Lawyered –Up” per their regulator’s requirements. Negotiating the Terms & Conditions of loan is far more important than negotiating a ¼ % interest rate difference between one bank and another. Terms & Conditions can cost the Association far more than a minor interest rate deferential.

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The Future of HOA Lending

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comThe advance of technology and social media have allowed technology-based entities such as Lending Tree, Prosper, Lending Club and other so-called “Fin-Tech” companies to all but destroy the traditional bank lending model. These high-tech bank alternatives often give borrowers more affordable, desirable, and easy to obtain methods to borrow money, pay off debt, and more. They further add the element of convenience by putting their resources at the fingertips of anyone with access to a smartphone, tablet, or computer.

Meanwhile, condominium associations, cooperatives, timeshares, and other HOAs seeking loans have had to rely on the “old-fashioned” bank lending model to obtain HOA loans. It no longer makes sense to simply rely on the bank where you deposit association funds. It is irresponsible to seek a loan by simply working with a single sales representative just because you are familiar with him or her. Why not let technology remove the cumbersome burden of searching for an HOA loan? Why not avoid the mistake of poor results from conducting far too narrow a loan search?

The future of HOA lending is here! HOALendingXchange (https://hoalendingxchange.com) is bringing all of the power of technology to streamline the HOA loan inquiry process for all HOA borrowers. Using our system, borrowers complete one simple loan inquiry and then relax while lenders compete for their business. They receive the best loan concepts for them to evaluate and decide which lender to pursue for their HOA loan. Best of all, HOALendingXchange is FREE of charge to the borrower. It costs NOTHING for a borrower to use the system.

Here’s how it works. HOALendingXchange invites HOA lenders to review all loan inquiries that fit their lending parameters. In other words, lenders have told us what types of borrowers and loans they are interested in. Borrowers submit their HOA loan inquiry anonymously. All of the banks that match the borrowers request are alerted and then, anonymously, put forth their most competitive lending concept for the borrower to review. It all happens quickly because of the power of technology. Borrowers can expect to have lending concepts to review in just three business days!

Ready to get your next HOA loan? Want to learn more? Head over to https://hoalendingxchange.com and get started today. You’ll have the best HOA loan concepts ready to review in just three business days. Welcome to the future! Welcome to HOALendingXchange!

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Q&A with the HOALendingPro: What’s the difference between a bank loan and an HOA loan?

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comI was recently presented with the following question from one of my clients. I am publishing it here, along with my answer, in hopes of sharing the knowledge. It is a common question that all of us within the HOA lending field should be able to answer.

Question:
What are some differences between a construction loan or line of credit from a “normal” bank and an HOA loan or line of credit as a specialized lending option? I’m having trouble understanding the pros and cons between them.

Answer:
The differences are very stark. A construction loan handled by a traditional bank reflects that there is real estate involved. The financing provided might be to construct a building, expand a building or recondition a building. In all cases, the real estate has different degrees of value during the build out period. The bank’s collateral is the value of the real estate. Depending on the bank’s loan policy, the borrower will need to provide 20% to 30% cash into the project in advance. Consequently, the bank has a vested interest in the value of the property during its various stages of change. Therefore, the bank will monitor the project in some way and they will release money from the credit line once stages of build-out have been achieved based on a budget submitted in the beginning of the project.

A construction line of credit to a community association from a bank that is skilled at providing such financing operates on an entirely different logic. There is no real estate interest in a community association. The community association has common elements that are not separable from the association and the property owners have an indivisible interest in the common elements. Consequently there is no real estate value. The financing does not rely on the value of real estate as does a traditional construction loan discussed above. What is being financed is the lack of reserves. In essence, the association should have accumulated cash reserves over time in order to pay cash for any project that needs to be done. The collateral for such a loan is the Assignment of the Association’s right to levy and collection regular and special assessments. It is a cash flow based loan. The bank looks to the level of budget increase that needs to occur to support the loan in order to make a credit worthiness judgment. It is typical for a community association specialized bank to provide 100% financing of the project. Depending on the loan policy of the bank, the bank might simply provide the funding to the association as a lump some and want to have any interest in the construction activity of the project. Other banks might provide a line of credit that is available to be drawn on at the sole discretion of the association. In other cases, the bank might want to see evidence that the project is being performed before they release funds from the credit line. Not because they have a value concern but only to be sure a project is being done at all.

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Is Deferred Maintenance Becoming a Crisis?

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comI recently was processing a loan application for $2.8 million for a Washington State condominium association of 66 units. The loan repayment was going to cause the Association’s regular monthly level income to triple. Not surprisingly, the Association responded that they could not afford such an increase. I appreciated that perspective and agreed. The sad part of the negotiation was that they still needed the funds in order to keep the property in a habitable condition. They were effectively looking for me to be a Genie and turn the Loan application into a Grant request. They were frantic because they were out of options.

I have been specialized in lending to community associations nationally for over 20 years. I have, in recent years, noted a concerning trend with loan applications. The loan requests have gone from funding the replacement of a single component such as a roof to becoming wholesale renovations of the respective buildings. The per-unit project costs have gone from an average of $2,500 to $25,000. The core issue is the underfunding of the Reserve Fund for easily determined future capital maintenance upgrades.

There are States that require, by law, community associations to have professionally prepared Reserve Studies and even require that the studies be updated periodically. The irony is that those proactive States do not require that Reserve funding indicated by the required Reserve Studies be fully funded. One of the States with the most rigorous set of regulations related to reserve studies is California. However, contradictory to logic, it is my most prolific market for loans due to excessive deferred maintenance of associations with inadequate reserves. The state wants the associations to know they are underfunded but they do not require that they solve the problem. What exactly is the point?

Reaffirming my anecdotal experience of excessive deferred maintenance is the number of loan applications that are due to a property being “Red Tagged”. This is something have I only been exposed to in the most recent five years. It is municipalities stepping forward and giving community associations formal notice that they have a specific date to get required repairs completed or the property will be condemned and must be immediately vacated. These types of circumstances do not come about overnight. Typically, there are warning notices issued over extended time periods. Yet, the Associations do not take the steps required. The dialog that ensues with me once these notices occur is that the unit owners cannot afford the repairs. Which is also to say that they could not afford the little bit of extra added to the monthly dues that would allow for building of cash reserves.    Effectively, the unit owners never could afford to live in the particular property that it is about to be taken from them.

In theory, loans for capital maintenance upgrades are not a product that should exist. There is no valid reason for a community association to be significantly under reserved. There is a very accurate and sophisticated system practiced by skilled and licensed professionals to generate life cycle analysis of community association components. The report generated is able to determine the estimated level of cash reserve needed at any point in time for the association to self-fund improvements. Special assessments should be limited to the potential differences in those estimates when actual repairs occur. The additional reality is that most people cannot afford to live in the units they currently occupy because they “claim” they cannot afford the projected future capital maintenance need that should be added to their monthly association dues.

 

There are 3 realities to living in a community association:

  1. The property will wear out.
  2. The improvement projects will not go away or become less expensive.
  3. The only place the funds to support the improvement projects will come from is the unit owners whether by building reserves, special assessments or loan payments.

 

It is my perception based on the ever-expanding problem. In the near future, regulatory agencies such as FHA, the insurance industry or the mortgage industry are going to inject themselves into the problem and require proper levels of reserves. Community associations are not likely to solve this pervasive problem themselves.

 

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Storm & Catastrophic Preparation – An Emergency Line of Credit

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comWe are in an age of dramatically more devastating natural events: frequent and expansive wild fires, intense hurricanes, stronger tornadoes and historic rains/snowfall resulting in record flooding. As never before, establishing catastrophe planning strategies supported by adequate insurance coverage is a critical element to restoring the facilities impacted.

There is a banking program specific to community associations that is particularly valuable for the environmental changes being experienced. The program has traditionally been referred to as a “Standby Line of Credit for Named Storm Damage”. The reason such a bank facility becomes valuable has largely to do with expediency and unforeseen dilemmas with insurance coverage. The general description of such a program is that it is an existing availability of cash specific to the occurrence of a particular catastrophe. The funds may be needed to protect damaged property from further deterioration, restore the property while waiting for insurance proceeds or to restore uninsured portions of a property. For instance, many communities have landscaping and ground cover features worth thousands if not millions that are not insurable. There may be unanticipated loopholes in coverage such as damage to a swimming pool from a flood not being covered.

An emergency Line of credit for named storm damage typically is structured as follows. The association applies with a community association specialized bank.    The loan amount is determined based on what level of restoration the association may want to accomplish in an immediate time period versus waiting for insurance proceeds. For instance, NOAA identifies the East Coast hurricane season as being from June through November. Consequently, a bank would establish an annually renewable line of credit for the time period of May 1st through April 30th. This allows for a community association to experience the catastrophe, draw on the credit line and hopefully have enough time to repay the amount advanced before the next hurricane season starts. A properly structured credit facility will have a term loan function built into the loan documents. Meaning, if the credit line is not paid off by the April 30th expiration date of the credit line, the principal amount outstanding will automatically convert to being an amortizing transaction. The term of this amortization period may be 3, 5, or 7 years. It is likely that if such a conversion occurs, the renewal of the credit line may not occur. Although this is the traditional product structure based on Named Storm Damage, the concept can be adjusted to accommodate regions susceptible to wild fires, flooding or tornadoes.

Approval for such a bank program may have some unique credit review criteria.   As insurance coverage is the anticipated appropriate payout resource, a bank may require review of the Association’s insurance coverage by a licensed public insurance adjusted to be sure the property is adequately covered. It is likely the association will need to have reserve balances that are sufficient to support the level of insurance policy deductibles. Other standard community association loan approval criteria will likely apply: delinquency level within an appropriate range; investor/owner ratio with an appropriate range; collateral being a first position assignment of assessments.

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Capital Maintenance Loans Can Provide Funding for Community Association Projects

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comCapital maintenance loans are available to condominium and homeowner’s associations to fund projects when there is a lack of adequate financial reserves. Whether you are a Property Manager, Board President or a service provider to a common interest community, there will likely come a time when there just isn’t enough money to fund the next big project. Inflation, failure to plan, unforeseen expenses and more can create a cash drain on even an otherwise successful community association. In the past, special assessments seemed to be the only way a community could quickly raise capital to fund these projects. Today’s savvy community association leader knows that a capital maintenance loan is almost always a better choice to fund such projects for so many reasons. HOALendingXchange can help!

Upfront benefits include the ability to act on behalf of the association as a whole rather than relying on the special assessment process of levying and collecting assessments. Owners within the association will be asked to increase their monthly payments instead of having to come up with a lump sum all at one time. This is more in line with how they pay for other expenses in the association and will not, typically, create an undue burden, unlike the special assessment which brings with it an ominous “pay now or else” collection approach. Once the capital maintenance loan is secured, the association can get on with the business of evaluating bids, hiring contractors, purchasing materials, and spending their efforts where it is most needed in bringing the capital maintenance project to successful completion. They can do so with the confidence that they have the ability to pay their vendors and suppliers, which savvy negotiators can even use to their advantage to get a better price.

The types of projects that are eligible for capital maintenance loans are extensive. They range from everyday items such as roof replacement to far more complicated projects like marina restoration. Capital maintenance loans could be used for sidewalks and walkways that need repair or a complete parking lot installation. The one thing all of these projects have in common is a large price tag. Even communities with healthy reserves should consider the value of financing their capital maintenance projects with a loan instead of draining the reserve fund. It allows the community to remain fiscally strong and complete its capital maintenance projects.

HOALendingXchange was designed with community associations in need of capital maintenance loans in mind. Our community association lenders are experts at working with community association leaders and designing capital maintenance loan programs that are right for them. Every community association loan we arrange is as unique as the community our banks loan to. We make it easy for communities to apply. To learn more and see if your community association qualifies for a capital improvement loan, get in touch with HOALendingXchange today!

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Reserve Studies: Preparing for the Inevitable Maturation of Building Components

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comSome things just get better with age. Wine or cheese, for example, may actually improve as they get older. The same cannot be said for the common elements of a condominium or community association. From the moment the first unit is built, the battle to maintain, protect, and enhance the building components begins. A well thought out Reserve Study is the proper guide to win this war. It can be the difference between success and failure in the struggle to keep the community’s common elements in great shape as it battles the process of maturation of the building components. HOALendingXchange always recommends association’s keep their Reserve Study current and active.

One way to assure that your community association is properly prepared is to hire a Reserve Specialist to review or prepare your community’s Reserve Study. Reserve Specialists have a unique set of skills that combine engineering (typically construction management, architecture, or civil) with financial planning. This allows them to not only summarize a community association’s current state of affairs but to also offer advice on how best to plan and save for future projects. While no Reserve Specialist can guarantee your community’s success by following the Reserve Study guidelines, it is far more likely that your community will thrive under its guidance.

Speak with a qualified Reserve Engineer. The Community Associations Institute (CAI) offers the Reserve Specialist (RS) designation to qualified professionals who have prepared at least 30 Reserve Studies within the past 3 years. They require the RS candidate to hold a bachelor’s degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering (or equivalent experience and education). Some states actually require common interest communities to conduct proper Reserve Studies and to adhere to their guidance in developing common fee schedules and contributions to the Reserve Fund. Finally, designated Reserve Specialists must adhere to the Professional Reserve Specialist Code of Ethics.

Reserve Studies cannot completely predict when building components will fail but they can provide solid financial advice on how those components can be paid for once they fail within a specified timeframe. Just as insurance is there in case Mother Nature deals your community a blow, a Reserve Study will help you prepare for Father Time’s visit. It is not a question as to “if” but rather “when” with regards to repair and replacement of building components in your community association. Without a Reserve Study, your community is relying on luck and gut feel of the Board to make financial decisions that will have a major impact on all members of the association. If your community association doesn’t have a proper Reserve Study, there is no better time to start one than now. And if your community association finds itself in need of an HOA loan to pay for revitalization or replacement of aging common elements, we’ve made it easy to seek the funds for the project. Simply fill out our inquiry form and our HOA loan experts will get busy preparing their very best HOA loan concepts for your consideration.

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Borrowing Is an Option for Home Owners Associations

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comArriving just in time for your aging common interest community is a fairly new option for condominium, cooperative, and timeshare boards – an option sure to smooth those riotous owners’ meetings. It is another arrow in your quiver to solve those nagging maintenance problems that just seem to come out of the woodwork (or are caused by it).

Whoops, we need a special assessment on top of the monthly assessment increase you just approved three months ago! So, who could know that a sinkhole would form in the parking lot?

The option that more and more condominiums are discovering is the bank loan. This option is arriving on the condominium scene all across the country as more and more properties are facing the problems of aging. Many condominiums were built in the mid- to late- 1970s, making them 30+ years old. It is well past time for things to go bad. Or, framing the problem in terms of technology improvements and desires for aesthetic changes, there is a need for upgrades.

Another group of complexes that have a lot of work to do are those built in the mid- ‘80s. Unfortunately, it is not unusual for this group to suffer from poor workmanship or low-quality materials. These weaknesses are now resulting in premature problems.

Typically, condominium associations have been left to their own resources to support the cost of the repairs that are needed. The results have not been particularly favorable. The cost impact of these projects makes residents shudder. Often, the projects compound on top of themselves with the result being maintenance imprudently deferred.

One way out of this dilemma is planning properly for failing components and financing the current project(s) with a loan sought through HOALendingXchange to smooth the impact on unit owners. By utilizing a loan, the cost of the project is spread over several years instead of a few months and most owners will appreciate this approach.

There is a third group of associations that can benefit from financing through HOALendingXchange.  These are complexes that are subject to land leases. These associations can purchase the lease and pay off the obligation long before the lease would ever mature in order to potentially save a large sum of money! Perhaps there is a need to purchase adjacent land as a buffer from undesirable development or to acquire a parcel that has been accessible only by easement. Of course, facility additions like building a clubhouse, pool, tennis court, etc., also make sense to finance.

Now, how do you find a bank that can provide the financing?  Financing for condominium associations is relatively new. Changes in state statutes across the country have made this industry a viable and safe place for bank financing. However, most banks have little experience with this industry. The first chore is to find a financial partner that is comfortable and skilled with financing a condominium association. HOALendingXchange is the logical choice to find financing as matching borrowers and lenders at HOAs, condominiums, cooperatives, timeshares and other common interest communities is our only business. Simply fill out our inquiry form and our HOA loan experts will get busy preparing their very best HOA loan concepts for your consideration.

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Lending to Condominium Associations

https://www.hoalendingxchange.comLending to a condominium association is not unlike lending to a municipality. No loan losses from condominium associations have been reported by those banks with the most lending experience, most notably in Florida and California. There are special considerations when lending to a condominium association, several of which are discussed in this article.

Common Interest Realty Associations (routinely referred to as CIRAs) are legal entities formed from the organization of real estate property owners, generally as non-profit stock corporations. They proliferated in the 1960’s when condominiums became the most common form. This concept evolved into other forms of CIRA structures, including cooperatives, home owner associations (HOAs), and time shares. HOALendingXchange.com services all of these types of CIRAs.

Items that can be funded are diverse. The unifying issue is that the funding be project-specific. Typical funding projects are such items as roof replacement, conversion to vinyl siding, driveway resurfacing, and central mechanical system upgrades. Associations have sought funding for expanding recreational facilities and purchasing adjacent land as a buffer for easement controls.

Whatever your financing needs are, you can be certain that a lender at HOALendingXchange.com has experience in your area of need. Simply fill out our inquiry form and our HOA loan experts will get busy preparing their very best HOA loan concepts for your consideration.

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